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3D Printing

Discussion in 'Skills, Business and Finance' started by BurtMeister3000, Feb 14, 2016.

  1. BurtMeister3000

    BurtMeister3000 Staff Member

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    Here is a video of it picking up the weight, struggling to suspend it via the vacuum sleeve, but with that said the sleeve wasn't designed for this. I have tried using it on a cylindrical tube and it felt like it gripped quite well, but when I attached it to the weight, the condom slid over the cone.

     
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  2. Mebs

    Mebs Active Member

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    I wonder would the xleeves from autoextender work? Wow,that is some seriously sturdy material if it is holding 20 kg!
     
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  3. BurtMeister3000

    BurtMeister3000 Staff Member

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    Here I attached it to a cylindrical tube from my spice rack (Thai Five Spice :p), to show the vacuum, but shame the sleeve kept sliding off when attached to the 20KG. Maybe if it was something a little more flexible like human tissue it would have handled it differently as it would have adapted to the internal pressure of the tube better than the solid cylinder?

     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2016
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  4. BurtMeister3000

    BurtMeister3000 Staff Member

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    Possibly. I have another material to print with other than PLA. Its called TPU, its medical grade non toxic stuff and is flexible, but strong. Might be ideal?
     
  5. BurtMeister3000

    BurtMeister3000 Staff Member

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    Attempting to print Vacuum Hanger MK2, but suffered nozzle blockage, strangely quarter way through a print.

    Will clear it and update with video progress on the second attempt.
     
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  6. Cali Girl 510

    Cali Girl 510 Well-Known Member

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    WOW! What great work and videos. That is so cool.
    On a side note, I also loved the baby giggles. Too cute!
     
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  7. BurtMeister3000

    BurtMeister3000 Staff Member

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    Thank ya!
     
  8. Kitsune

    Kitsune Staff Member

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  9. MrSpock

    MrSpock Active Member

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    In your experience, how do you like the idea of 3D printers, and working with them? Is it too big of a hassle or things are smooth? And how about the financial aspect too?

    Is it feasible and/or helpful to make things that are useful in everyday life?
     
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  10. BurtMeister3000

    BurtMeister3000 Staff Member

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    My 3D printer is the first one I've bought. I ordered it from Ebay, from China. It didn't come with any assembly instructions, so I mostly pieced it together just using logical thinking. I did eventually get some instructions from the seller, but he didn't speak very good English and my Chinese is, shall we say a little rusty (non existent).

    I think if you have a problem solving brain or like tinkering with things, it can be a lot of fun. But I can't stress enough that patience is key. Anyone printing for the first time, expect print fails and most likely lots of them! I've had more fails than I have successes, but to me, it makes it more rewarding when you do get a print out successfully! Once you get used to working with them, you do start to know what to look for when things are going wrong, but I'm still learning with this one, however my success rate has increased a great deal compared to when I first started.

    Financially, this one was pretty cheap as far as 3D printers go. I paid £200 + £20 something for customs charges. The filament, I think I paid around £6 for a kilo PLA spool and after having printed with it for a good while now, having lots of failures I probably have just over 3/4's of the spool left. Other filaments vary in cost, I have another called TPU which is a more rubbery, flexible, but strong material that cost £30. So, yes this stuff can get expensive, but its a cool hobby and is most certainly feasible to print things to help you in your day to day life.

    There are a few things I need to print, like a replacement sat nav holder (dunno where mine went?) and one for my dad, he lost his too. The PE equipment I'm currently printing/perfecting will be used when I get around to resuming my routine. I've printed a load f spares for the printer itself. I will be printing a phone camera holster to create a steady base to make video's for our Youtube channel. I was going to print one for the wife for her bike, as she always complains there is some crazy people out there on the roads. Would be good to have a video of this if anyone ever does anything dangerous as cameras don't lie.

    So to sum up, 3D printing can be fraught with problems, but when you get it right, it absolutely rocks! And the only limit is your imagination (and your build size) to what you can use these things for. I'm still relatively new to this and have just started printing my own designs. The design process is also a challenge, but I'm picking it up quickly and my ability to work my way rounds design problems seems to be getting better. So, all in all, its good exercise for the grey matter and teaches you patience, whilst having practical application in the real world. Also if you are of the mind to take your innovations industrial, I believe they are great for making prototypes before mass production.
     
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