1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
Dismiss Notice
The Plan of Attack

Feel free to join in the chat now!

Click the reply button at the bottom of discussions to comment!

Spirituality and wellbeing

Discussion in 'Spiritual and Mental Well Being' started by Mebs, Feb 18, 2016.

  1. Mebs

    Mebs Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2015
    Messages:
    1,217
    Trophy Points:
    123
    Would any of you have close connections between your spirituality and well-being? Are you guys spiritual and how does this affect your physical and mental well-being? Do athiests on here think that their lack of belief have positive effects on their well-being?

    *Not a thread about whether or not God exists etc.
     
    BurtMeister3000 likes this.
  2. BurtMeister3000

    BurtMeister3000 Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2015
    Messages:
    1,614
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Where the eye can't see.
    Definitely!

    I think the more I practice meditation, the greater well being and feelings of spirituality. I feel the two are linked.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2016
    Mebs likes this.
  3. Corvid

    Corvid Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2016
    Messages:
    305
    Trophy Points:
    103
    To an extent, but not really in the "god" or "no god" sense. Similar to the lsd experience, i remind myself that everything is connected. We tend to think of ourselves as separate, self contained entities, but we're not - that's just a product of excessive intellectualism and a disconnect from nature and natural, harmonious (with nature) living. We are more a part of this world than we are a product of it.. we are an expression of the earth. The ecosystem we have now shaped us, made it possible for us to exist, we are indistinguishable from it.
    There is a sense of spirituality in that interconnectedness - I can feel it when I rest my hand on a tree in the forest, when I meditate and breathe the air, and when I interact with animals and look into their eyes.
    Being disconnected from nature and not taking time for regular walks in the forest or country cycles definitely affects my mental and physical health negatively.
    I find the beach and being in the ocean has a similar positive effect on my sense of well being. The ocean, with it's timelessness and vast power reminds me of how small I am, how temporary everything is.
    I don't like the prospect of death (who does), but I like to remind myself that everyone and everything dies. There's a sense of fairness in it, and knowing that countless individuals have lived before you, faced the same problems, fears and sense of mystery in life helps me to remember not to take life too seriously, and helps me not feel as separate from other people in my mind.
    It also makes it clear to me that death is a necessary part of life, because if we lived forever we would probably lose our sense of wonder in the world. Everyone we knew would just be there forever, why bother talking to them then, what new thing could they tell us? The magic of birth, growing up and learning would not be a part of life anymore.
    Sometimes I get a sense that we are the universe bearing witness to itself, loving itself, wondering at it's own beauty. Like that could be our purpose, to love and experience the beauty and mystery from within the universe, as a part of it. Kind of like a baby in the womb of if. There's is a real tragic beauty in our frailty, our aging, our supposed temporary existence.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2016
    BurtMeister3000 and Mebs like this.
  4. Mebs

    Mebs Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2015
    Messages:
    1,217
    Trophy Points:
    123
    Yeah, it is funny you should mention that as I was just looking over a section in my book where I am discussing that. p.s. I can't wait to have this fecking thing done, it is melting my head now at this stage.
     
    BurtMeister3000 and Corvid like this.
  5. Mebs

    Mebs Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2015
    Messages:
    1,217
    Trophy Points:
    123
    Yeah great post Corvid and I feel the same about pretty much all of what you said. As you know I am a nature-whore too, I feel really weird and fucked up when I am caught in urban areas for great lengths of time without 'touching base' with nature. Come to think of it, I get pretty down when I am in big urban areas, I just feel physically and emotionally choked by my environment. If I don't have a touch, a feel, an interaction with the natural, with what I consider to be spiritually close to me, I feel all fecked up.

    I don't particularly believe in a God or buy into any particular religion, but I do feel there is more than just the physical realm in the world. There are many different layers to our experience and one that really encapsulates my emotional and spiritual core is a bond with nature. I feel most at peace in tranquillity, amongst nature, away from urban decay, pollution and people in general. I find it has a great effect on my well-being. When I am trapped at moments in my life where I am forced to work in urban areas or long hours on my computer, I feel it really drains me and sucks the life out of me.

    If I dwell on death, uncertainty about life and just the sheer terrifying nature of our existence, it really does a number on my mental well-being. Sometimes it just simply paralyses me and fucks me up beyond belief that I cannot really do anything or enjoy anything in life. I lose sight of all the things I have in life and all the advantages and positives I have going for me and just focus on the inevitability of dying and death. For me the two are very closely related - well-being and spirituality.
     
    Corvid and BurtMeister3000 like this.
  6. seikatsu

    seikatsu Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2016
    Messages:
    36
    Trophy Points:
    28
    My spirituality is very much tied to my well being. I believe in a higher being and I know I am happier because of this. And I know death will be something unnerving, especially if you are at death's door --- which I see a lot, being a medical doctor. However, because of my faith, I actually know that there's more to life than what I see now - something more beautiful and perfect. In the same way, I see the handiwork of my God in each majestic creation/nature and it is actually during those times when I am communing with nature that I feel closer to my God - away from the "noise" that is inescapable in the city life. And when corvid was talking about how "small" we are -- I always get amazed at how much my God loves me despite my imperfections and how he pays attention to the smallest details of my life. So even IF it turns out that my God does not exist -- Id still choose to believe in Him because I know I am all the better because of it.
     
    Mebs and BurtMeister3000 like this.
  7. Mebs

    Mebs Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2015
    Messages:
    1,217
    Trophy Points:
    123
    All very good posts guys :)
     
  8. Corvid

    Corvid Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2016
    Messages:
    305
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Definitely - like I've said before, we "receive" or perceive within a certain range, there's much more going on beyond our perceptive abilities. Animals can perceive things we can't, equipment/technology can extend our perceptions too. It's beyond being termed a belief, unseen phenomena are everywhere, all the time.
    My whole childhood, I think I was in a real forest once when very young, and at the beach a handful of times. I was in that taxing suburban environment for most of my young life. The forests and beaches blew me away when I finally had my own transport to reach them. Fell in love with both of them instantly.

    Yes, unfortunately. When I was in my late teens and 20's, I wasn't much afraid of death beyond the involuntary reflexes of self preservation. Now, especially since I've been ill, death has become a real and present fear. It's not everyday, all the time - but there are times when I become keenly aware of my mortality, keenly aware of how easily I can die with lots of things unsaid and undone, and the prospect is terrifying. A long, slow illness with gradual decline is one of the worst possibilities for me. Most days, it doesn't bother me. It's like there's a layer of programming, a protective screen between us and our full awareness of death, and that screen is functional most of the time in most people. I'm grappling with the concept of death and illness more frequently in recent years, and some times I'm fine with it, other times it's overwhelmingly awful. It's getting easier though.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2016